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EarthScope

EarthScope: Reassembling a Continent in Motion
How do you watch an entire continent as it moves? The proposed EarthScope project would allow earth scientists to study North America on a continental scale.
Gregory van der Vink for the EarthScope Working Group and steering committees


Science on Tribal Lands
Land management requires good earth science, especially for one of the country's most significant land-owning populations: Native Americans.
Susan M. Marcus

Coming Soon...
May: Water
June: Preserving Geoscience Data
July: Highlights of trends and research

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newsandview.html
April 19
Superplumes across the mantle
April 16
Deadlines approaching for Wash. and N.H. geologists
April 12
Marshlands in danger
April 1
Aftershocks in Taiwan
March 29
Piece of the tectonic puzzle found
March 26
Shallow earthquake hits Afghanistan

Webextras Archive

News Notes
USGS water research threatened
Life on the rocks
East vs. West in the inner core
Trouble in British Columbia
Field Notes

Comment
Science Funding out of Balance
Advances in science and technology are keystones of economic prosperity. We need to support a broad portfolio.
The Honorable Sherwood Boehlert


Political Scene

Turning a Request into Reality
It is going to take a major effort by the geoscience community to convince Congress to fund EarthScope. But the long-term payoff will be worth it.
David Applegate

Geophenomena
Slip and slide in Kentucky
Dry spell in the Eastern U.S.
Quake shows Turkey quick and nimble
Webextras on recent large quakes

Technology
3-2-1 Meltdown
The Cryobot: It burrows, it melts, it collects.
Christina Reed
 
 

 ON THE COVER  DEPARTMENTS
cover ON THE COVER
The continental United States (pictured here rotated 90 degrees) is home to active faults and volcanoes. In this image, yellow dots indicate earthquakes with magnitudes of less than 6.0 that have occurred since 1980. Open circles are earthquakes between magnitudes of 6.4 and 8.0 that have hit since 1900. Triangles represent major volcanoes, white lines represent active faults, and the red circle and triangle in the center mark the Yellowstone hot spot. Earth scientists still have many questions about the structure of the North American continent and how all these dynamic processes relate to each other. Read story. Photo supplied courtesy of the IRIS Consortium.
 
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